Reflection, Planning & Tiny Steps – a Podcast

DrawingYourLife_300-200x300In our 2nd (as yet unnamed) podcast, Fabian Kruse and I chat to our guest Michael Nobbs about his new book Drawing Your Life.

We take some time to reflect on how 2013 is shaping up for each of us so far, following what Michael suggested could be a Month of Reflection and Planning in January and a Month of Tiny Steps in February.

We also delve deeper into the process of choosing a small manageable activity that allows you to get at least 20 minutes of creative work done each day – which isn’t quite as simple as it sounds!

Something To Link About – Good Intentions Edition

Polatross Calendar 2013 by Blythe Robertson

Polatross Calendar 2013 by Blythe Robertson

What have people been talking about this week? The vast expanse of a brand new year, of course.

The Onset of Annual Review Syndrome

Chris Guillebeau has written about his annual review process now for a number of years, but this was a more vulnerable post than usual, as he is coming towards the end of his goal to travel to every country in the world, and has been feeling “sad recently for reasons I don’t understand”. The final country he is visiting will be Norway in April and I’ll be joining him in celebrating his achievement at a party in Oslo.

Other annual reviews I enjoyed included ones by Emilie Wapnick of Puttylike, Jonathan Mead of Paid to Exist, and Lis of Last Year’s Girl.

Don’t Mention the R-word – Goals, Habits and Good Intentions

New Year’s Resolutions are soooo 2012. I shared some New Year “What Ifs” – read Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3.

Michael Nobbs has decided to delay the New Year and make January a month of reflection and planning.

Fabian Kruse, meanwhile has declared 2013 a year of writing.

James Clear writes about the power of small wins and identity-based habits.

Dan James writes eloquently on A Big Creative Yes about the benefits of a daily practice in his post Permission, Practice and Coming Out of Hiding.

Dave Ursillo urges you to create more bad art.

Vishnu, a spiritual guru who is after the jobs of both Chopra and Oprah, spoke to life coach Susan Fox about setting goals.

Kim Manley Ort is planning a year of contemplation by studying the poetry of Rilke.

Mary hopes to spread some postal joy in 2013.

Blogging, Digital Marketing and Social Media

Fellow copywriter Andrew Nattan raises some burning blogging issues for 2013.

Daily Beast/The Dish blogger Andrew Sullivan raised $333,000 in one day to support his move to running a completely independent blog.

Dave Charest shares a great library of small business marketing tips over at Constant Contact.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation shared their review of 2012 and digital rights activism across the globe.

Wired UK did a feature on Scott Harrison from Charity: Water who has used digital campaigning to great effect.

And finally, William Shatner uses personal communicator to transmit message to space.

Have you read anything good this week? You can post a link in the comments.

Have a great weekend! 

Teaser Trailer for Mad Geniuses

At the weekend I’ll be releasing the first ever Clear-Minded Creative Micro-Manifesto.

It’s called The Career Masterplan for Mad Geniuses and it will be completely free to download!

You can watch the teaser trailer below, which explains a little more about it. The trailer was filmed and edited entirely in the iMovie app on the iPad.

If you enjoyed it, please share! The usual buttons are below, or you can CLICK TO TWEET.

Subscribe now to be notified when it goes live!

100-start-up-cover

Clear-Minded Classic #9: The $100 Start Up by Chris Guillebeau

You may have heard of Chris Guillebeau. He is at the forefront of a new breed of bloggers and creative entrepreneurs who are making a substantial income from their creative output, and inspiring thousands of other people to do the same.

As well as writing for free on his blog and in his two hugely popular manifestos, Chris has published a number of Unconventional Guides * which offer up to the minute advice on freelancing, publishing and travel hacking, and even the art of building your own online empire. As well as pursuing his goal of travelling to every country in the world before the age of 35, Chris has worked tirelessly to build his platform and a community of people around him, and he’s made a fantastic living from it.

In his new book, the $100 Start Up, which is already out in the US and available in the UK from this week,  Chris provides a clear guide to getting started with your own business, using the examples of hundreds of members of his community who have done the same. He provides concrete figures too – he only features those who are earning at least $50,000 a year, but many of the businesses featured bring in several hundred thousand pounds a year. Most of them started with around $100 dollars.

That’s pretty amazing, right?

As Chris says in the introduction:

Small businesses aren’t new, but never before have so many possibilities come together in the right place at the right time.

One of the key points that Chris is making is that anyone can start a business if they can just grasp some of the key concepts in the book and apply them to their own situation.

Most of them aren’t geniuses or natural-born entrepreneurs. They are ordinary people who made a few key decisions that changed their lives.

The man himself

A New Angle on Creative Careers

The book makes a great companion to two previous Clear-Minded Classics: Career Renegade by Jonathan Fields and Escape From Cubicle Nation by Pam Slim. Both Jonathan and Pam are friends and associates of Guillebeau, and their messages are similar.

Whilst Career Renegade is a great ‘awakener’ to alternative career possibilities for creative people, and Slim’s book is all about the transition from corporate employee to business owner, the message of $100 Start Up is more straightforward and not necessarily aimed at creative types.

It deals with all types of businesses, from dog walking to language learning. But it isn’t hard to see that anyone who is able to turn $100 into a liveable annual wage is using a great deal of creativity. And Chris himself is a great example – a writer who is extremely successful, not just scraping by.

The Basics of Business

The “$100 start up” Chris is recommending could also be referred to as a micro, or freedom business. Your goal is to have freedom for yourself, but to do that you need to provide real value for others, and to communicate that value to them as clearly as possible.

Ultimately, Chris’s message is a simple one. He covers the basics of building a small business and emphasises that you don’t need more that, at least to get going. Taking action, and making that first sale, is all important.

The basics of starting a business are very simple; you don’t need an MBA, venture capital, or even a detailed plan. You just need a product or service, a group of people willing to pay for it, and a way to get paid.

He adds that it helps to have an offer and a way of building interest, or hustling, and to use well proven techniques such as a launch strategy.

What the book goes on to outline is bound to make a few internet marketers sweat; people have been selling this information online packaged in expensive clothes for a long time now. Chris has brought the advice all together into one easy to follow book which will cost you around a tenth of his suggested start-up costs, much less than most of the information products which include similar info.

Throughout the book Guillebeau provides simple, but comprehensive one page checklists to help with choosing between competing projects, creating a basic business plan and market testing – as well as the essential ‘reality check’. You can get additional resources at the dedicated website for the book.

Of course, there are plenty of areas touched on in the book that you might want to investigate more deeply. But if you have any interest in earning money on your own terms, once you’ve read this book you’ll be struggling to come up with an excuse for not getting started right away. As Guillebeau says:

“The most important thing is to keep taking action”.

Buy the book at:*

Amazon.co.uk

Amazon.com

This photo isn’t staged at all, honest..

How I Intend to Use the Book – Action & Commitment

I’ve bought a number of products from Chris in the past and have found them very useful in my transition from civil servant to freelance writer. His blog was also a key inspiration behind this one.

However the book is a great reminder to me that I have been stalling somewhat in using the knowledge I already have. I could potentially earn money in more ways than just copywriting for businesses, and I intend to more fully explore some of these other options.

It is also an eye-opener when it comes to how much money many of the people featured are earning on a regular basis and whilst my quality of life is more important to me, it has convinced me I need to be a bit more ambitious in terms of my financial goals.

Disclaimer

Chris is one of those ‘everyman’ figures – someone who seems relatively normal and therefore inspires others to follow his lead. However he is a very smart guy who works extremely hard. Not everyone can be him!

Multimedia Journalist and blogger Adam Westbrook, who is briefly featured in the book, has a great summary of the kind of mindset needed for this kind of work – he highlights Courage and Commitment as the keys to starting a business. Clear-Minded Creative Type Melissa Dinwiddie also highlights the importance of mindset and talks about how she has been inspired by Chris Guillebeau.

As you know if you read this blog regularly, I struggle with the commitment part e.g. when it comes to consistently working on this blog, and I’m actively trying to improve my own habits and work ethic.

All the information in the world isn’t enough if you don’t follow through, and this is a great reminder to keep pushing myself. Basically, if this book doesn’t inspire me (and you!) to get moving, nothing will.

(note: the above links are affiliate links which means if you buy them, Amazon might one day send me a gift voucher (I’m not holding my breath). The link above to the Unconventional Guides website is also an affiliate link, but Chris’s affiliate programme is a lot more generous so I might actually earn some cash if you use that one. There is more info on affiliate promotions in the book!)

Unconventional Guides

Staring Failure in the Face

I don't need a telescope to see where I went wrong

Sunday, 7:30am.

I wake up in unfamiliar surroundings. I realise I can stretch out on the bed, even though she’s here too. It’s a bigger bed than I’m used to. I look up and see sunlight streaming in through the curtains. It feels warm.

Paris! The first morning here. A trip to celebrate our first wedding anniversary. I’m tired. I forget how tiring travelling is.

My third trip abroad in four weeks – an extravangance only possible because I’m not working full-time. I’m not used to the excitement. It has a cumulative effect, making me more tired each day. I feel groggy, but excited to get outside and explore the city.

But.. so tired. She is also stirring beside me, but doesn’t seem very awake. I reset my alarm on my iPhone to 8:30.

(First decision of the day: to fail.)

8:30. Time to wake up properly. She makes us a cup of tea. I get my iPad and wireless keyboard. Time to write. I may not have achieved the 7:30 wake up time, but I can write 1000 words each day that I’m here.

I start typing. This is what I write:

“So here we are en Francais, and I can’t really be bothered with my writing but here we go. I have to do it, right? At least this is highly portable.

But what to write about?”

I put down the keyboard and pick up my cup of tea. That is all I write, the entire trip. All I want to do is enjoy my holiday with my wife. Discover a city I’ve spent less than 24 hours in so far. Relax, and forget. Stop striving for a while.  Fuck it.

(My second decision of the day is to fail.)

Wednesday

We get home to Edinburgh. The rain pours down outside and it’s as dark as dusk, all day.

I look at my to-do list. I sent it to him before we left, with a list of ‘deliverables’. It now seems wildly ambitious. Whilst in Paris I was going to come up with a plan. Instead I shut out the future and the past, apart from the unavoidable one evident from the extravagant architecture around us.

Sunday

I stare at the blank page. I have failed. No way round it. Because I announced the challenge publicly, now I have to admit my failure, publicly. But what to say?

Monday

I wake up, watch a couple of episodes of TV spy drama Nikita. Nonsense, but entertaining. Afterwards, in my mind, I carry out a debriefing, an interrogation, of myself, like it happens in the show.

Why did I fail? Because I chose to, twice.

What can I do? Admit, accept, try again.

I sit down and write – this.

Tuesday

What will my decision be at 7:30am?

 Related:

It’s not surprising I’ve been used as a prime example of the “lazy controller” syndrome by creative consultant Jeffrey Davis (his solution: eat chocolate for breakfast- might have to try that).

Gwyn Michael also talks about “staring down failure” today on the Scoutie Girl blog.

The Ditch the Day Job Diaries – Episode 1

Below is the trailer for the first episode of the Ditch the Day Job Diaries.

The full first episode will only be available to email subscribers and will go into more detail of how I am building a freelance business and adjusting to a whole new lifestyle!

Sign up below and receive the first episode tomorrow (Thursday 9th Feb 2012).

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myface_insta_mysite_7

Alex Mathers from Red Lemon Club

I’ve been a fan of Alex Mathers and his Red Lemon Club blog for quite some time. The site provides really solid advice for freelance creatives of all kinds. Alex’s own speciality is illustration, a topic covered by his other site, Ape on the Moon – so he talks from experience – and of course this means all of his sites and products are extremely well designed.

Alex is releasing a new ebook today designed to demystify the latest social network from Google that hardly anyone seems to know how to use properly, Google+. The guide is designed specifically to help creative freelancers to attract new clients and simplify their online presence. As you can see from the below interview, he knows his stuff.

Please can you describe who you are and what you are up to at the moment?

I’m a London, UK-based self-taught illustrator and writer working on various illustration projects, including something for Wired magazine right now. I run a website called Red Lemon Club that aims to help other freelancers, entrepreneurs and creatives with going it alone, finding clients, doing business, and so on.

I’m about to make a move to Tokyo to experience things from a different perspective and can’t wait!

Did you always know what you wanted to do (creatively) or has it been a process of trial and error to get to the point you’re at now? If it’s the latter, how did you decide what to focus on?

Practically everything that I’ve ever done up until this point has been a result of trial and error, and gradual change. I like to try out new things but also make a point of sticking with something once I’ve started it, and allowing it to evolve over time, fine-tuning as I go.

I’ve stayed focused on particular things, like my illustrations, by always having a vision in mind of where I would like things to go. The thing is, that vision always changes slightly (but not dramatically), and that’s how things progress. When I first started illustrating, things looked a lot different to how they do now.

I’ve Just Run Out of Excuses

Yesterday I left the civil service after almost exactly 10 years to the day I started. You can read some background to this in one of the previous newsletters. Somewhat spookily, given this was my last day of repeating the same routine over and over again, this happened on Groundhog Day.

Another coincidence – on the way to work, I was listening to a playlist of 120 cheesy songs and ‘The Final Countdown’ by Europe came on just as I was approaching the building – at which point I started singing along at the top of my voice, obviously!

Man with a Plan or Unemployed Bum?

Because I voluntarily accepted redundancy, I will receive a decent lump sum. If I’m careful, I can survive on this for a year, even if I didn’t have any other money coming in.

My plan though, is to continue to work as a freelance copywriter, which is something I’ve been doing since I cut down my working week to four days at the beginning of 2011 – but now it will need to be on a much bigger scale because this time next year it will probably be my main source of income.

I also want to ramp up my blogging efforts again. The point of this blog was always to help other creative people find focus and achieve their potential – and I’ve only just scratched the surface so far.

Developing a new business as well as blogging is going to take a lot of focus and discipline, even though I’ll no longer be working a day job at the same time. Key to this is establishing productive habits and spending my days wisely.

I also want to ensure I have time for exercise and my own creative projects/experiments, whilst I have the luxury of being able to structure my own time.

Every Moment Counts

Every moment counts for me this year. It’s hugely important. But what’s new? I wouldn’t be here if I hadn’t have done some legwork. I couldn’t have done this if I was heavily overdrawn or in credit card debt for example (I do have student loans but it was under the old system which means I can continue to defer them for the time being).

If I hadn’t already been paid for my writing and other work I might not have had the confidence to take the leap (even then it was a tough decision). My previous job, whilst it had it’s frustrations, did mean I got a lot of experience with digital media and marketing, and the fact I’ve been writing, blogging, using social media and producing audio and video content for many years is also a bonus.

Also worth pointing out is that over a year ago, on the advice of  Jonathan Mead, I set a very specific goal: to ditch my day job by 31st March 2012. This was before I knew the opportunity to take voluntary redundancy would arise. In fact, I forgot that I had done this until I looked at my calendar for 2012 a few weeks ago, but the intention was always at the back of my mind – never underestimate the power of committing to clear and highly specific goals.

One of my leaving gifts

Everything you do is a step in either the right, or wrong direction to achieving what you really want out of life. That’s what this blog is really about. Whatever situation you’re in right now, it’s a good thing to remember. Of course we can also put too much pressure on ourselves – rest and relaxation, enjoying life and HAVING FUN has to be part of the plan too.

This is an important post for me, and I’d  be really grateful if you would share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus or wherever you see fit using the handy buttons below.

Oh, and why not join over 100 people who already subscribe to the newsletter and like CMC on Facebook, and over 1000 people who follow me on Twitter: @milomclaughlin

p.s. I know I dropped the ball with this blog last year but I’m back now, and I’ve got no more excuses – so expect big things :)

Ali George

How to Write 12 Books in 12 Months – An Interview with Writer/Illustrator Ali George

Most writers are faced with a difficult decision as October draws to an end – whether to take part in NaNoWriMo (more details below). I’ve never managed it myself and having tried and failed to write a novel when I was younger the thought brings me out in a cold sweat.

So for the next in the Clear-Minded Creative Types series I looked to local writer Ali George for advice and more info on what drives her to work so hard.

As well as being a NaNo veteran, the level of output she maintains on her own blogs and in a variety of other outlets is hugely impressive, and oh yeah, there’s that small challenge she set herself for 2011 – writing a book every month. I hadn’t even realised that she is also an illustrator.

Would you take a pill to jump-start your creativity?

I was honoured that top Scottish blog Bella Caledonia recently described this blog as ‘ever-helpful’ and added generously that it “clears all writers’ blocks”.

Whilst regular practices like the morning pages really do help with creative problems of all kinds, I have to admit that being blocked still happens to me sometimes – and the thought of an instant cure is an attractive one, especially one that could bring out a previously untapped level of genius.

In fact one of the warning signs that I’m creatively blocked is when I feel the urge to retreat into mindless escapism, and there is nothing better for mindless escapism than the latest Hollywood flick. It was with this in mind that I sat down to watch the film Limitless, which has recently come out on DVD in the UK.

I was intrigued by the premise, which is about a writer who takes a pill which apparently releases the full force of his creativity, genius and intelligence, the majority of which has previously remained dormant.

The unshaven, scruffy protagonist (played by Bradley Cooper) is clearly suffering from writer’s block, and I had to snigger at the voiceover, which said something like “who, apart from someone who’s addicted to drugs or alcohol, looks this bad? Only a writer.” I can certainly relate to that (I’m in urgent need of a haircut and a shave myself).

Once he inevitably takes the pill, the protagonist goes on to crank out the first few chapters of his book in one evening. The next morning he can hardly believe he’s done it, and neither can his agent. He soon goes on to complete the book.

Now I hate spoilers as much as anyone so won’t say anymore, but the film soon veers off into a sort of wish fulfilment fantasy/cautionary tale and unfortunately the ending is a confusing mess. But it made me think about how difficult it can be just to sit down and do our creative work.

It ain’t easy.

Whenever I sit down to write, my mind does seem to have an endless array of excuses to stop me getting on with it. Because of the nature of this blog, anytime I feel blocked I begin to feel somewhat of a fraud, which again makes me even more blocked.

I try to make myself feel better about this by reminding myself about all the other writers out there who go through similar things. There’s George R.R. Martin who famously took 6 years to write the latest installment of his Song of Ice and Fire series, upon which the recent Game of Thrones HBO series is based (I hope he manages to finish the series a bit quicker as I’ve just read the 4th book and whilst it wasn’t as thrilling as the first three, I still want to find out how it all ends).

There are other films which deal with writer’s block too – such as Stanley Kubrick’s brilliant version of The Shining and Charlie Kaufman’s bizarre but highly original Adaptation.

And this excellent article in Slate is one of the few I’ve seen which acknowledges just how difficult writing can be, and draws on some academic research which goes some way to explaining it (thanks to @usherette and others for sharing it on Twitter).

Finally I think the hardest thing about being creatively blocked is actually acknowledging the fact at the time that it’s happening. I wonder how many stupid, self-destructive, self-sabotaging things I’ve done throughout my life just because I couldn’t progress creatively, without even realising what was the problem. The wise thing to do would be to take some time out and meditate, or do some exercise. That probably helps a lot more than getting blind drunk or eating a family size bag of Chocolate Buttons in one sitting.

Do The Work

I’ve recently started work on the first ever Clear-Minded Creative manifesto, which I’ll be announcing more details about soon. I can already feel the excuses crowding my brain, but I must fight back and be ever-vigilant about being creatively blocked. I’ll be reading The War of Art yet again, as well as Pressfield’s latest and equally great publication Do The Work, and trying to build my defences up.

But if you are attracted to the idea of a simple pill that could solve all your creative blocks, I’d recommend reading the original book by Alan Glynn which the film Limitless is based on – it’s available on the Amazon Kindle now for only 72p or $1.12 – a bargain. And the ending is much better than the inexplicable Hollywood-ised version too.

Do you ever get blocked creatively, and if so, how do you deal with it?

Don’t you hate it when Hollywood tacks on an ending and ruins a decent story?

Share your woes/tips in the comments!

Get Limitless by Alan Glynn at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk

Get Do The Work by Steven Pressfield at Amazon.com or Amazon.co.uk

Main image: edoardocosta Post contains Amazon affiliate links.

aw

Clear-Minded Classic #3: The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron

When I was about 20 years old, I was totally and utterly lost. I was in my fourth year of studying for a degree and I was disillusioned with the whole process. I could see no clear way forward in terms of finding a job or career at the end of it, and I was drinking heavily.

When I was younger I’d always been creative. I used to make and sell my own comics, and then my interest moved into acting and making videos. One of the reasons I came to Edinburgh to study a Communications Degree was because the course curriculum included film-making. The prospectus had featured photographs of a pretty girl with a video camera and daft as it now sounds, that pretty much sold me on coming over from Ireland to check out the college for an open day.

When I arrived, the beauty of the city itself sealed the deal, plus the promise of decent gigs in both Edinburgh and Glasgow. I was also keen to get as far away from home as possible, as my parents had recently separated and I wanted to be as independent as possible. I was 16 when I moved.

Unfortunately it turned out that making videos was only a small part of the course, and by the time the opportunity came I was already drinking too much to properly focus on it. I could have made more of it if I’d had the right mindset – but I was already sucked into a kind of apathetic black hole where I just wanted to blot everything out rather than face up to reality.

At a certain point though, I had a moment of clarity and realised that if I continued in this way I was going to be in a seriously bad situation when I left college, if indeed I managed to complete my degree at all.

Thankfully, when I was browsing the shelves in Waterstone’s I spotted a book called The Artist’s Way and I found the real kick up the arse I needed.

Now I was not your typical purchaser of self-help books. After all, my whole persona at the time was centred around being a drunken cynic and nihilist.I can’t actually remember doing it now, and what was going through my mind at the time, but I’m guessing it was a sense of desperation that led me to buy the book.

As it happens, it was the perfect book for me to read at the time.

What’s the big deal?

The Artist’s Way is undoubtedly one of the most popular books ever written about creativity. A number of people have mentioned it in the Clear-Minded Creative Types series of interviews or when commenting on this blog, and time and time again it will pop up in conversations about the topic. There’s even a whole online forum devoted to it.

But not everyone is sold on it, because of its heavy focus on spirituality. It’s basically a recovery programme for people who have lost their faith in their own creativity, and so has similarities with recovery programmes for addictions, such as alcoholics anonymous. A key part of it involves believing that creativity has a spiritual origin.

Now although I am not a member of any religion I do have spiritual beliefs. But I don’t want to impose my views on anyone else so I’ll just say this -if you’re a truly committed athiest or agnostic who cannot stand any foray into this type of thing, then the book isn’t for you. Having said that, there are some great methods for getting more creative and clear-minded you could still take from it, which I’ll detail below.

What’s Involved?

Working with this book you will experience an intensive, guided encounter with your own creativity – your private villains, champions, wishes, fears, dreams, hopes and triumphs. The experience will make you excited, depressed, angry, afraid, joyous, hopeful and ultimately more free. Julia Cameron

So, to reiterate, the Artist’s Way is more of a recovery programme than a book which you sit down and read and then put away and forget forever. It involves making a commitment to read a chapter a week for 12 weeks, and to establish two key new habits in your life:

  • Daily “Morning Pages”
  • A Weekly ”Artist’s Date”

Plus there’s a bunch of other tasks at the end of each chapter. Now I’m not sure how much of these additional tasks I did when I first went through the book, but when it came to the morning pages, I committed and stuck to them like my life depended on it.

The whole idea is to write for 3 pages every morning, without censoring yourself. You just keep writing, even if it’s the first daft thing that pops into your head. They aren’t meant to be re-read, and Cameron strictly forbids you to share them with anyone else. The point is to be completely honest and real. She describes them as a form of meditation, the sole purpose of which is to get all the crap in your head out onto the page and thus leaving you more clear-minded.

We meditate to discover our own identity, our right place in the scheme of the universe. Through meditation we acquire, and eventually acknowledge our connection to an inner power source that has the ability to transform our outer world. Julia Cameron

You don’t need to be a writer, as this isn’t about creating something literary or clever. This is a splurge of words, which creates the space you need to allow the spark of creativity to be re-ignited.

An outpouring of words

Doing the morning pages led to an outpouring of writing for me. I would get up and start writing the moment I woke up, and often I would be writing poetry with images from my dreams, which were still fresh in my mind. I wrote a bunch of lyrics and some short stories. I was delighted to be writing again and it gave me renewed hope for the future.

Last year I started doing this again, via the site 750words.com. Based on the idea of the morning pages (750 words is about 3 pages) this brilliant site is cleverly designed to encourage and reward those people who manage to write every day. Over the course of a few months last year I clocked up 100,000 words. Some of it was just plain journalling, as Cameron suggests, but sometimes I would write a blog post or something else if I was inspired to. I worked a lot on the idea for this blog and what I wanted to cover on it.

Cameron goes on to describes the artist date as “a block of time, perhaps two hours weekly, especially set aside and commmitted to nurturing your creative consciousness, your inner artist”. She says this is equally as important to the morning pages as a way of opening yourself to inspiration.

The Censor = Resistance

As we saw in the previous Clear-Minded Classic The War of Art, Steven Pressfield identified the enemy of creativity as ‘resistance’. Cameron sees the problem as ‘the censor’ – another internal barrier we need to overcome.

We are victims of our own internalised perfectionist, a nasty and eternal critic, the censor – who resides in our (left) brain and keeps a constant stream of subversive remarks that are often disguised as the truth’ Julia Cameron

As with the resistance, the inner censor is a clever foe, and it takes a lot of work to get around it. but I’m sure you don’t need me to tell you that..

There’s a lot more to The Artist’s Way than I can go into here. If you’re already firing on all creative cylinders then you probably don’t need this book, but if you’re willing to do a bit of soul-searching and feel like you need to recover that creative spark inside yourself it’s most definitely worthwhile.

Now I reckon it’s about time I started doing my 750 words a day again…

Buy The Artist’s Way on Amazon.co.uk

Buy The Artist’s Way on Amazon.com

Have you read/used the Artist’s Way? Let me know your thoughts in the comments.