My Radio Enso Interview: Juggling paid work and personal projects

I was delighted to be invited to take part in an interview for Radio Enso, a fantastic podcast by Gregory Berg, who I met in Portland at WDS 2012 and who lives in San Diego.

Greg is a true gent, asks fantastic questions and once you hear his voice I think you’ll agree he was born to be a radio host. In fact he recently celebrated 130 episodes, three years on the air and 200,000 listens overall!

We talked about some of my favourite topics, which it turns out are also close to Greg’s heart – meditation, masculinity, music and the DIY ethos, and making a living from creative work for clients whilst also juggling personal projects.

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Blog Lovin’, Better Habits & Making Space for Your Creative Work

A casual discussion about the freedom of writing and being a blogging warrior turned into a fully-blown podcast about the advantages of multiple offices, the positive domino effect of introducing more positive habits one at a time, including how cutting down on caffeine can help you get up earlier. (But can admittedly be tough if you rely on it to get your work done!)

Yes, I’m talking about the latest Mountain Shores Podcast (episode 7) with Fabian Kruse and myself. You can listen over at the MoSho website or listen/subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher.

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I’ve gone into more detail on the topic of making space for your creative work over at medium.com – this is a sneak peek of the long-delayed but ‘definitely coming eventually’ Produce the Goods Micro-Guide (part 4 of the Career Masterplan for Mad Geniuses).

It was also great to see Arran Arctic’s take on the previous MoSho episode including illustrations of Dave Ursillo’s anecdotes re: leaving his job to become a writer, which follows on nicely from the Graphic Recorder’s sketchnotes of episode 5.

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Arran’s posting some great stuff on his ‘Do Give Up the Day Job’ blog so do check it out. Also, does anyone want to take up the baton and do an illustration for the newest episode? We’d love to see how you interpret our meandering discussion!

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Tiny Office TV: Five Tips for Focusing on Your Creative Work

I’ve been experimenting with short, rather silly videos on Instagram and Vine. I like the fact these are very limited in terms of length (Instagram videos can’t be any longer than 15 seconds, and Vine videos can’t be longer than 6 seconds). I also like the fact that there’s no real editing or uploading to do, unlike the Ditch the Day Job Diaries, which take ages.

So far, I’ve got six tips for you (although the last one is VERY daft indeed). Vine videos play automatically I’m afraid, and to hear the audio you may have to click on the ‘unmute’ symbol in the top left corner.

Want to see more? Keep an eye out for the hashtag: #tinyofficetv

Tiny Office TV trailer:

Tip #1: Turn off social media notifications

Tip #2: utilise the self-control app to get your work done quicker

Tip #3: keep a captain’s log (not that kind of log)

Tip #4: Take a dance break

Tip #5 (in 5 parts): Sometimes, to be your own boss you have to kick your own arse. (Or, if you don’t sit down to do it, the work ain’t gonna get done.)

Is Your Employer Exploiting Your Creativity?

An article by a former ad man who sadly died of cancer recently has been doing the rounds.

He concludes somewhat bitterly that he had been deluding himself throughout his career by thinking that working in advertising was some kind of higher cause. He suggests that the industry as a whole exploits employees’ natural impulse to create as well as a tendency to set themselves high standards and crave praise more than money. Below is a short quote but the whole piece, whilst sobering, is well worth reading.

“It is a universal truth that all artists think they are frauds and charlatans, and live in constant fear of being exposed. We believe by working harder than anyone else we can evade detection. The bean-counters rumbled this centuries ago and have been profitably exploiting this weakness ever since. You don’t have to drive creative folk like most workers. They drive themselves. Just wind ‘em up and let ‘em go.”

What do you think? Are creative people being taken advantage of by employers?

Original source:  Business Insider