Video: Edinburgh’s Secret Courtyard

This is my highly unofficial Guide to the Hidden Door Art Festival 2015, filmed on the final night (Saturday 30th May). Running time = 5:15 minutes which  admittedly is long for an internet video these days, but there was a lot to pack in. (Also, there’s some NSFW language at the beginning).

I’m convinced this was one of the best events ever in Edinburgh, thanks to the combination of the space itself and the independent artistry it hosted, plus the fact you could wander around and peek into the various buildings and rooms and there was always something interesting to experience.

Four Ways to Turn Past Hardships Into New Art

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Your Hard Work Isn’t Wasted

If you’re creative but feel like success has so far eluded you, it’s important not to forget or discount the things you’ve already done.

Even if they don’t feel like things that would impress anyone else, they’re part of what has made you what you are now. Everything you’ve done has contributed to your unique mixture of knowledge and skills.

None of your hard work is ever really wasted – unless you decide to disregard it.

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Alex Mathers from Red Lemon Club

I’ve been a fan of Alex Mathers and his Red Lemon Club blog for quite some time. The site provides really solid advice for freelance creatives of all kinds. Alex’s own speciality is illustration, a topic covered by his other site, Ape on the Moon – so he talks from experience – and of course this means all of his sites and products are extremely well designed.

Alex is releasing a new ebook today designed to demystify the latest social network from Google that hardly anyone seems to know how to use properly, Google+. The guide is designed specifically to help creative freelancers to attract new clients and simplify their online presence. As you can see from the below interview, he knows his stuff.

Please can you describe who you are and what you are up to at the moment?

I’m a London, UK-based self-taught illustrator and writer working on various illustration projects, including something for Wired magazine right now. I run a website called Red Lemon Club that aims to help other freelancers, entrepreneurs and creatives with going it alone, finding clients, doing business, and so on.

I’m about to make a move to Tokyo to experience things from a different perspective and can’t wait!

Did you always know what you wanted to do (creatively) or has it been a process of trial and error to get to the point you’re at now? If it’s the latter, how did you decide what to focus on?

Practically everything that I’ve ever done up until this point has been a result of trial and error, and gradual change. I like to try out new things but also make a point of sticking with something once I’ve started it, and allowing it to evolve over time, fine-tuning as I go.

I’ve stayed focused on particular things, like my illustrations, by always having a vision in mind of where I would like things to go. The thing is, that vision always changes slightly (but not dramatically), and that’s how things progress. When I first started illustrating, things looked a lot different to how they do now.